Substance-Induced Psychosis Treatment

Mental health disorders can not only interfere with a person’s life, but they can also cause lasting emotional and physical damage. If you think your loved one is struggling with a mental health disorder, it is important to get them help, especially if they could be suffering from a substance-induced psychotic disorder and their physical well-being is at stake.

What Is Substance-Induced Psychotic Disorder?

Substance-induced psychosis disorder is a mental illness characterized by a series of psychotic episodes that are presumably brought on by substance use. There are both drug-induced psychosis and alcohol-induced psychosis. The psychotic episodes often include abnormal thinking, hallucinations, and a disconnect from reality. Substance-induced psychosis can occur for a variety of reasons such as taking too much of a substance, mixing substances, or withdrawal, but it is usually the result of an underlying mental health problem that is exasperated by drug or alcohol use. Unfortunately, psychosis is often related to a high risk of suicide with 18.4% of first-episode patients attempting self-harm or suicide.1 Treatment of substance-induced psychosis is similar to dual diagnosis treatment and involves stopping substance use and addressing any underlying mental health problems.

Symptoms of Substance-Induced Psychosis

A person who is struggling with substance-induced psychosis will present various symptoms related to psychosis, but as a result of substance use. Some common substance-induced psychotic disorder symptoms include:

  • Irregular thoughts
  • Poor psychomotor behavior
  • Hallucinations – perceptions of something that isn’t actually there
  • Delusions – false beliefs
  • Paranoia
  • Dissociation – disconnect from the real world
  • Alexithymia – lack of emotions or emotional expression

Substance-induced psychosis treatment should be done immediately because psychotic episodes often require hospitalization to keep the person from harming themselves. A medical professional will also need to determine if the psychotic disorder is related to substance use.

Substance Abuse-Induced Psychosis & Addiction Treatment

Although a psychotic disorder and a substance-induced psychotic disorder have similar symptoms, they are distinct mental health disorders and require different treatment. At Banyan Mental Health, our medical professionals will perform a full mental health and physical assessment in order to determine the best treatment for each patient.

As a member of the Banyan family of rehabs, we provide substance abuse-induced psychosis and addiction treatment so that patients can address both the psychotic symptoms as well as the substance abuse problems that are causing them. During their time at our residential mental health facility in Boca, patients will not only have 24-hour support to battle their substance abuse disorders, but they will also spend much of their day in programming that is focused on addressing their poor mental health. These therapies range from holistic to evidence-based practices with trained mental health professionals that will be tailored for the patient’s specific substance-induced psychosis treatment plan. Patients will also have a designated therapist that they can talk to individually and as well as group therapy sessions where they can connect with peers facing similar issues.

If someone you love is in need of substance-induced psychotic disorder treatment, do not wait to get help. Psychotic episodes can put your loved one in danger, so treatment for psychotic disorders should be done sooner rather than later. Contact us today to learn more about how to start the process.



Sources:

  1. BMJ Journals – High rates of suicide attempt in early-onset psychosis are associated with depression, anxiety and previous self-harm

Related Readings

What is Alcohol-Induced Psychosis?